Author Topic: Social Security  (Read 2537 times)

daysofelijah

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Re: Social Security
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2017, 06:50:33 AM »
You can only earn about $17,000 here in MN or they start taking away $1 for every $2 you earn over the limit on my survivor's benefits. So I've always worked part time to keep it under that for the last five years.

I got a new job and will be getting remarried in May, so then I will lose my benefits. I have to go in to SS and see how it will affect my children's benefits though.
Amy, mom to four (14,13,10,6)

Nymets1986

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Re: Social Security
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2017, 07:41:53 AM »
I called this morning as I just got the death certificate and the earliest office appointment I could get was early February!! :o 

tybec

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Re: Social Security
« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2017, 08:02:14 AM »
There are limits.  It is good to have the meeting.  Your circumstances need to be discussed, your family.

I just learned something interesting.  I didn't sell my home, as it fell through as the buyers didn't sell theirs and though they got a bridge loan, got scared.  So, my house is sitting there, and I may rent come Jan. as it is has been empty since Aug., which is not good. 

Well, my benefits as survivor are based on earned income.  Renting out my house is not earned income. Wow!  So, I could continue to work part time at new job, keeping it under the approximate net 17,000, get my benefits and make money off of renting.  This whole system of loop holes is crazy. Never did I think I would be thinking out loud of this, be in this situation.  I worked full time since age 21. 

Survivor benefits will go away when my son turns 16.  I will get his benefits until he graduates HS, which will be after his 18th birthday. 

I may work more and not be able to get the survivor benefits.  But a friend told me, "Why?  It is a gift to work pt time and take care of your son.  Why not?"  Well it was a costly gift, but yes.

Will see.  Good luck on finding out what works for you.

Nymets1986

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Re: Social Security
« Reply #18 on: December 08, 2017, 09:35:03 AM »
Does anyone know if social security backdated as my appointment is not until early February?  I qualify for the one time payment  and my children qualify for survivor benefits but  I do not the survivor caretaker benefits as my income is too high.

Julester3

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Re: Social Security
« Reply #19 on: December 08, 2017, 11:56:30 AM »
They will pay you your children's SSI benefits from when your spouse died. I didn't even have a death certificate for 90 days so my appointment was in August, over 4 months from when my husband died. I got a big amount by the end of the month.

MikeR

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Re: Social Security
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2017, 05:25:56 PM »
Nymets...

No, there is no earnings test for you. Your kids get SS survivor's benefits flat out. I was also working full time and well over the limit for personal survivor benefits but my kids got (one is still getting) benefits. Apply right away.

Tot he original poster - I know a widower who was "audited" ny SS and he had kept very detailed records of what he s[end on his kids - receipts, etc. He sent a book to them with a listing of all the expenditures, copies of receipts and their comment was "No one has ever done that before". Needless to say, they never asked him again.

For your case, just send copies of your recent utility bills, rent payments (that counts as much as a mortgage does!) any credit card statements that show what you bought for the kids, any receipts you might still have. On top of that, simply list any other expenditures you can think of (estimates are ok) and say you don't have receipts. Most people can demonstrate spending above the amount they receive for the kids.

The more paper you can give them the less they will bother you.

Other things to think about:
Entertainment (movies, school outings, vacations!, meals when taking trips)
Clothing
School supplies
Medical expenses (you should have EOB's to oshow what you were responsible and if you don't, ask your health insurer for an annual printout)
Sports team fees
Allowances


Don't worry,
Mike
Cathryn, your love made me what I am today.I am in awe of you.

Michael

MikeR

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Re: Social Security
« Reply #21 on: December 17, 2017, 01:00:13 PM »
Nymets,

There is no limit on how much you earn for KIDS' survivor benefits. If you are getting DIRECT survivor benefits, there is a limit. I also was the primary earner (the only earner, actually - my wife stopped working to take care of the kiss). I got benefits for both kids and I continued to work full time, earning well above the $17,000 mentioned in other posts.

Jennica,
As far as saving for college goes, it doesn't matter what money you save - cash is fungible. You can't say which dollar is yours and which is SS money if it's all in the same account. If they give you a dollar and you put it into your bank account, then spend a dollar on your kids, which dollar did you spend? Yours or SS's?

I have investment accounts for both of my kids, I used one for my somn's college and waiting to use the other for my daughter. I have the SS money paid into a regular bank account and then my financial guy automatically withdrawn money to put into their college accounts. I find it to be easier that way.

In general:
If you say you saved any amount, they will keep track and when your child turns 18 they will ask for it back and will then send your 18 y.o. a check for that amount. Although you could ask your kid to turn the money over to you, they don't LEGALLY have to. Why go through that? Just write that you spent it all.

Copies of mortgage payments (or rent checks), utility bills, phone bills, etc. are perfectly acceptable documentation of expenses. If you have one child, you can allocate 50% of those expenses to them. If you have 2 kids, they each get 1/3 allocated (2/3 total!). Just copy the bills, write on the copies how much was for the kid(s) and send them to SS. The more paper you inundate them with, the less likely they will keep asking questions.

An example:
                             Monthly Major Expenses
                             Total Amount   Amount allocated to 1 kid
Rent                       $1,000            $500
Utilities (heat, elect) $  150            $  75
Food                       $   200            $100
Clothing                  $     30            $ 50
Auto Exp                $   100            $ 50

Total                       $1,480            $740

Annual allocated to kid - $8,880.

This doesn't include any other expenses such as entertainment, school, vacations, toys, etc. As you can see, it isn't that hard to get to the total SS is giving you!

MikeR
Cathryn, your love made me what I am today.I am in awe of you.

Michael

Jennica

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Re: Social Security
« Reply #22 on: December 17, 2017, 04:48:39 PM »
Thank you for this. This information is so helpful!!!

Jennica

cathead

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Re: Social Security
« Reply #23 on: December 31, 2017, 08:47:05 PM »
Don't forget birthday gifts, Christmas gifts, any extracurricular activities or private lessons, sports equipment, meals out, movies out, any special TV programming you buy for him, his cellphone (if he has one), dental care, etc.