Author Topic: my eyes are bigger than my stomach  (Read 749 times)

donswife

  • Member
  • Posts: 549
Re: my eyes are bigger than my stomach
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2017, 08:20:54 AM »
oneoftwo....count me in !:)
but instead I will have peanut butter and toast for now
My everything

Julester3

  • Member
  • Posts: 404
Re: my eyes are bigger than my stomach
« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2017, 09:35:53 AM »
Peanut Butter toast here often for breakfast or lunch! I feed my kids better.

Bunny

  • Member
  • Posts: 282
  • widowed 2012
Re: my eyes are bigger than my stomach
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2017, 09:49:20 AM »
My husband had a stepdad who was English and taught him about beans on toast. I myself couldn't get on board, but it sure was nice to be able to make him that as a 'treat' when I didn't feel like cooking!
It is a fearful thing to love what Death can touch.

Love2fish

  • Member
  • Posts: 42
Re: my eyes are bigger than my stomach
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2017, 10:51:42 AM »
Peanut butter & toast & bacon can be comfort breakfast lunch or dinner.  Often was.

ladybug

  • Member
  • Posts: 66
Re: my eyes are bigger than my stomach
« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2017, 05:02:26 AM »
Since I am alone now, I buy the meals already made at the grocery store deli.  You are so very right .......don't tell anyone in the real world about it.    They would have way too much to say about it.....

I learned that lesson years ago when I was first a widow.

Thank you everyone for sharing your food stories.

Christopher

  • Member
  • Posts: 47
  • I came, I saw, I tried... I left.
Re: my eyes are bigger than my stomach
« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2017, 05:16:24 PM »
I used to like food and I loved cooking those big dishes for my beloved and sitting down to dinner at the table.

Now I just eat whatever. Peanut butter toast sounds good, I haven't had it in over 7 years. I suppose I'll have to get a toaster...

I used to make big batches of spaghetti and meat balls, lasagna, chili, mexican buffet style and similar cooking adventures. Now my son cooks most of his own food (he's 12 and his creativity is gradually increasing) and I just grab whatever.

During the first year of being widowed, my fridge was in varying states of "too much leftovers" and "not enough food." It was tough to adjust since after my beloved passed my brother stopped crashing at my place on the regular and moved out of state for college.

I had to learn to "cook for one." That was difficult as I have been cooking for a family since I was 6 and had to use a chair to reach the stove top. It took a paradigm shift to come out of the "let's make a big batch of <whatever>!" behavior.