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Leadfeather

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Personal Information

  • Date Widowed
    11/27/2016
  • Name of Spouse
    Christine
  • Date Widowed
    November, 2016
  • Cause of death
    Mitral valve prolaps
  • Spouse's Age
    47


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  1. Leadfeather

    New Relationships....Post a Pic

    We will be married next month. Last night she was in the backyard of the new house that will be our home, cutting wildflowers to place next to LW's ashes. She is an amazing woman.
  2. Leadfeather

    widowed 3rd may 2019

    I am close to 1000 days out from the death of my wife. The sadness does not go away. But you will get stronger and the sadness will not occupy your whole being. You will find a way to build a new life from the wreckage of your old life. For me it took a conscious choice to be grateful for the time I had with Christine rather than angry that it ended before I was ready for it to end. Be kind to yourself. What you are feeling is valid but you will not feel like you are drowning forever. Just before I came here and read this a 1 year memory popped up in my facebook feed. I think it was something I had copied from Reddit, I do not know the author. It helped me. Maybe it will help you. ----------------------- Author unknown I'm old. What that means is that I've survived (so far) and a lot of people I've known and loved did not. I've lost friends, best friends, acquaintances, co-workers, grandparents, mom, relatives, teachers, mentors, students, neighbors, and a host of other folks. I have no children, and I can't imagine the pain it must be to lose a child. But here's my two cents... I wish I could say you get used to people dying. But I never did. I don't want to. It tears a hole through me whenever somebody I love dies, no matter the circumstances. But I don't want it to "not matter". I don't want it to be something that just passes. My scars are a testament to the love and the relationship that I had for and with that person. And if the scar is deep, so was the love. So be it. Scars are a testament to life. Scars are a testament that I can love deeply and live deeply and be cut, or even gouged, and that I can heal and continue to live and continue to love. And the scar tissue is stronger than the original flesh ever was. Scars are a testament to life. Scars are only ugly to people who can't see. As for grief, you'll find it comes in waves. When the ship is first wrecked, you're drowning, with wreckage all around you. Everything floating around you reminds you of the beauty and the magnificence of the ship that was, and is no more. And all you can do is float. You find some piece of the wreckage and you hang on for a while. Maybe it's some physical thing. Maybe it's a happy memory or a photograph. Maybe it's a person who is also floating. For a while, all you can do is float. Stay alive. In the beginning, the waves are 100 feet tall and crash over you without mercy. They come 10 seconds apart and don't even give you time to catch your breath. All you can do is hang on and float. After a while, maybe weeks, maybe months, you'll find the waves are still 100 feet tall, but they come further apart. When they come, they still crash all over you and wipe you out. But in between, you can breathe, you can function. You never know what's going to trigger the grief. It might be a song, a picture, a street intersection, the smell of a cup of coffee. It can be just about anything...and the wave comes crashing. But in between waves, there is life. Somewhere down the line, and it's different for everybody, you find that the waves are only 80 feet tall. Or 50 feet tall. And while they still come, they come further apart. You can see them coming. An anniversary, a birthday, or Christmas, or landing at O'Hare. You can see it coming, for the most part, and prepare yourself. And when it washes over you, you know that somehow you will, again, come out the other side. Soaking wet, sputtering, still hanging on to some tiny piece of the wreckage, but you'll come out. Take it from an old guy. The waves never stop coming, and somehow you don't really want them to. But you learn that you'll survive them. And other waves will come. And you'll survive them too. If you're lucky, you'll have lots of scars from lots of loves. And lots of shipwrecks
  3. Leadfeather

    Will life suck forever (on the top of grief)?

    I am sorry you went through this. Don’t give up. It only takes one good one to make weeding through the bad ones worth it.
  4. Leadfeather

    Somedays are harder than others

    She is doing very well. They do not know what caused all the dizziness but it seems to have passed.
  5. Leadfeather

    Somedays are harder than others

    Do what you want to do. They are not in your shoes and while they mean well they do not know your needs as well as you do. I sold my 5 bedroom house a few years after my wife died. She did most of the yard work because she had time to do so. I could not keep it up. I tried an apartment it was fun for a while but isolating. Then I bought a much smaller house since my kids are leaving or have left the nest. It is where my fiance and I will start our new chapter together. It is your life. Make a quilt if you want to and if you can afford it hire someone to do the stuff you can or don't want to do. Sell the house when you are ready or don't if you want to keep it. After being married for 25 years, it took me a while to adjust to doing what I wanted with my life without talking it out with my partner. Remember it is your life and there is no reason you can not live it as you choose. Your late husband would want you to live a life that brings you joy. Honor his memory by doing so.
  6. Leadfeather

    Song's that bring a tear.

    new song came on as I pulled out of the driveway on the way to work. I was bawling by the time I had gone a block. Had to stop at my Fiancée’s house for a hug.
  7. Leadfeather

    In ER with Fiancé.

    She is home in bed. Nothing serious was found. Thanks for listening.
  8. Leadfeather

    In ER with Fiancé.

    I’m sitting in the ER next to my fiancé as we wait for her to get a CAT scan and other tests for the waves of dizziness she has felt today and the last few weeks. Same hospital my father died in 4 years ago. My head keeps going back to finding my wife dead in the yard. Here is hoping it is nothing but some vertigo. Not sure why I am posting but it helps.
  9. Leadfeather

    How to handle triggers?

    That looks like a really interesting book. Ordered it. Thank you for the recommendation!
  10. Leadfeather

    Anniversaries close together

    Her Birthday, Our Anniversary, and Valentine's Day all in the same week. Made it easy for me to remember the years we were together. Makes it easy for me to remember now that she is gone. 😥
  11. Fuck that I never got to say goodbye and tell her one last time that I love her. Thank you God that I had her in my life for 27 years.
  12. Leadfeather

    There are worse things than death

    I have no words.
  13. Leadfeather

    First vacation without my husband

    My boys and I went to Gilda’s Club for a while. They had weekly grief sessions, a community meal and then breaking off into groups. A group for teens, one for young adults, one for widows and widowers. It was helpful. Check and see if you have s local chapter.
  14. Thank you for the answers. It truly has been helpful.

Personal Information

  • Date Widowed
    11/27/2016
  • Name of Spouse
    Christine
  • Date Widowed
    November, 2016
  • Cause of death
    Mitral valve prolaps
  • Spouse's Age
    47


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